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First 3D Printed Spinal Implant

PITTSBURGH…June 27, 2017 – Advanced Orthopedics and Rehabilitation (AOR) announced today that Dr. Jocelyn Idemais now using a new medical device created with an advanced additive manufacturing technology, also known as 3D printing, as part of its lumbar spinal fusion treatment options for patients with degenerative disc disease and other spinal conditions.

See the Press Release Here

Tritanium Press Release 6.27.2017 – Idema

The Tritanium Posterior Lumbar Cage from Stryker‘s Spine division is a hollow rectangular device that is placed in the intervertebral disc space, along with a bone graft, to help restore and maintain normal spacing between the vertebrae, and to stabilize the spine. The cage is constructed using Stryker’s proprietary Tritanium technology. Tritanium is a novel, highly porous titanium alloy material designed for bone in-growth and biological fixation.

In contrast to traditional manufacturing methods, 3D additive manufacturing is a process that creates three-dimensional objects by adding layer upon layer of material. Guided by special computer-aided design software, a focused laser beam melts layers of titanium particles, essentially “growing” the device from the bottom up. The technology gives Stryker the ability to create unique porous structures from a material that resembles cancellous bone, a type of spongy bone tissue.

Dr. Jocelyn Idema states that “I’m excited to add Stryker’s Tritanium technology to my spine practice. In patients where conservative treatment has failed and spinal fusion is indicated, the Tritanium technology adds another dimension to successful spinal fusion outcomes. By using this bone in-growth and biological fixation technology, I anticipate that our approach to spine fusion surgery will become a major game-changer in the way surgeons will approach spine fusion surgery in the future.”

What is lumbar fusion?

Lumbar interbody fusion is a surgical procedure performed to reduce pain by joining, or fusing, two adjacent lumbar (lower) vertebrae so that there is very little movement between them. In lumbar interbody fusion, the disc space is cleaned of disc material and an interbody device, or “cage,” along with a bone graft, is inserted into the disc space. The cage helps restore and maintain normal spacing between the vertebrae to stabilize the spine while the bones grow together, fusing that section of the spine.

Lumbar fusions are most commonly done at the lowest of the lumbar spine’s vertebrae (L4) and the first vertebrae of the sacrum (S1), the bottom of the spine. A spinal fusion is designed to join two adjoining levels may be considered for patients with severe pain. The surgeon also must implant supplemental spinal fixation systems, such as pedicle screws, rods, or plates.

Patients typically remain in the hospital one to two days following spinal fusion surgery. The timing of a patient’s release will vary, depending on his or her overall physical condition and progress following surgery.

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