Heterotopic Ossification and Your Cervical Spine

Heterotopic Ossification (HO) is one of the most common complications following hip arthroscopy. It is estimated that up to 44% of do not receive medication prophylaxis will experience some form of complication following this procedure.*

In cervical spine surgery, namely total cervical disc replacement surgery, this complication is present but not to the same extent. In any regard, I prophylactically treat all of my patient’s undergoing a total cervical disc replacement with a prophylactic dose of medication for a few weeks after their case.

Heterotopic ossification (HO) occurs and forms as a result of some type of trauma (whether controlled trauma = surgery) or (uncontrolled trauma = accidental injury). What occurs with HO is a “deposit” of bone around the soft tissues that surround a joint – that ultimately leads to a “bone-building” or osteogenic response in the surrounding muscles.

This further creates these bone deposits of normal bone in abnormal places and locations. Using medications to help provide prophylaxis to the body and this process = targets this bone deposits. Using a NSAID further alters the target muscle cells and tissues, disrupts the body’s signal of producing these bone deposits, and finally it further modifies the environment where the bone will be deposited by allowing a less conducive environment for these cells to deposit the bone there in the first place.

There are numerous articles on using prophylactic why NSAIDs have become the recommended treatment strategy for HO prevention. Usually using medications like, Indomethicin or Naproxen, can usually help curb the potential for HO deposits.

Of course there are risks associated with using NSAIDs, such as GI upset, kidney side effects, and the risk for bleeding. Many people also have allergies to these medications, so judicious evaluation of the risks/benefits need to be weighed.

Please see here – HO and Hip Arthroscopy

You Might Also Enjoy...

The Benefits of Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery

Your doctor tells you that your back pain could be improved or resolved if you undergo minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS). What does that mean, and can it really be as effective as traditional surgery? MISS is just as effective and safer, too.

When You Need Surgery for Disc Herniation (21046)

Herniated discs are common, particularly if you’re athletic or aging. Or both. Most of the time, a slipped disc heals on its own with physical therapy and medications. If it doesn’t, you may need surgery to fix the herniation and relieve the pain.

Help! I've Been Hurt on the Job

Nobody goes to work expecting to be injured or sickened. But almost 3 million times per year, that’s exactly what happens. What should you do if you’ve been hurt on the job? First, get to a doctor as soon as possible.

What Are Preop Protocols?

Your doctor tells you that you need surgery. But successful surgery requires more than just showing up to the hospital on the right day. You and your doctor must make preparations to ensure the best outcome. Here’s what you — and they — have to do.

The Many Benefits of an Independent Medical Evaluation

You’ve been injured in a work-related accident, a car wreck, or other incident. When you file your worker’s compensation or other claim, you’re assigned an independent medical evaluator. But should you trust someone else’s IME?